Friday the 13th Financial Fears

Happy Friday the 13th! If that sends you into a panic – don’t worry, today marks the only time that the 13th will fall on a Friday this year.

If you are one of the 17 to 21 million Americans with friggatriskaidekaphobia (fear of Friday the 13th), you may be reading this from the safety of your triple bolted safe house. But is Friday the 13th really that unlucky?

In the spirit of Friday the 13th, we asked our expert writers to share their biggest financial fears that you should pay attention to today and everyday because it is important to plan ahead, save as much as you can, and of course… avoid breaking mirrors!

“I think as a mother who is self-employed my biggest financial fear is not having enough savings. Life can throw things at you and it’s important to have something to ride those rough patches. For me having automated transfers gives me peace of mind so I can focus on my family and my work.” Elle Martinez, Couple Money

“I feel like my wife and I save appropriately. By that, I mean that should be able to retire comfortably when that time comes, yet we are spending enough to enjoy our lives along the way.  One of my biggest financial fears, however, is the cost of long term care (LTC).  I don’t believe the insurance market has figured out LTC yet.  Today, it seems that all but the richest and poorest among us have a giant bull’s-eye on our collective backs should we ever need long term care.”  Michael Rubin, Total Candor

“I’ve tried my best to mitigate many of my financial fears. However, I’m a little fearful that my wife wouldn’t really know how to handle our financial situation if something were to happen to me. I’m also a little fearful about my ability to bring in consistent income through self-employment.” Phil Taylor, PT Money

“With longevity in my family I expect to live well past one hundred, and that’s what scares me the most. As I get older and medical and care services grow more expensive, will my money last as long as I do? I’m doing the best I can right now to save and invest, but planning so many years into the future is a source of great uncertainty.”  Ginita Wall,    planforwealth.com

“My biggest financial fear is what would happen to my family if I were to die prematurely. We’ve done the basics of estate planning but there’s always the nagging fear that I forgot something or that I haven’t explained our situation enough to my wife for it to be as seamless a transition as possible. I’ve written up a “Finances Bible,” that explains what everything is and where it is, and I hope that’ll be enough… but you never know.” Jim Wang, bargaineering.com

 

 

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