Finance

Finance

Finance

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  1. It’s been more than a month since Mr. Nolan posted this, but it’s still on ST’s front page, so I’ll put in my 2 cents. A crbaon tax is a great idea, much better than cap and trade. By the way, James Hansen discusses this in his 2009 book Storms of my Grandchildren . I agree that a crbaon tax, one with no exceptions at all, is needed to help start and ease the transition to conservation and renewable fuels. I agree with using a tax and dividend system for any crbaon tax, in which all crbaon tax revenues are distributed equally, automatically, and frequently (monthly or quarterly) to all citizens, age zero and up. It should be completely separate from the federal budget. Tax and dividend is the simplest way to do it. It’s net effect is to have conservation and renewable energy replace fossil fuels, and does so without increasing taxes overall because we get back what we pay. It keeps it out of the hands of Congress/Corporations, which means it doesn’t get used for war, corporation subsidies, etc. Some people would be glad it doesn’t go to human welfare, arts programs, those crooked climate scientists, etc. It wouldn’t be subject to loopholes. It’s roughly in proportion to one’s expenditures, so the poor will get back more than they pay. We would respond to the tax by cutting our fossil fuel use; we could invest the difference between the rebates and the tax for retrofits and local energy production according to our own judgment as to what is best. This could include community efforts, such as a co-op which could aggregate and leverage small individual investments to fund local energy generation, such as (multitudes of) solar arrays, geothermal, windmills and a central biomass plant.The tax should be monitored for effectiveness; if the transition slows, the tax should be raised.

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