Can You Claim Your Elderly Parents on Your Taxes?

Family

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) allows you to claim your elderly parent as a dependent on a tax return as long as no one else does. If you choose to claim an exemption for your parent, you must also ensure that you are not an eligible dependent to another taxpayer. This restriction is effective even if the taxpayer who can claim you as a dependent chooses not to.

Satisfying the gross income test

Unlike claiming a child as a dependent, it is not necessary that your elderly parent live with you. However, if your parent has gross income that is not exempt from tax of $3,650 or more, you cannot take their exemption on your return. When evaluating your parent’s gross income, do not include their social security payments and other tax-exempt pensions. Their gross income does include, however, dividends, capital gains from the sale of stock, interest earned in a bank account and other passive investments such as income from rental properties they own.

Satisfying the support test

Not only must your parent have minimal gross income, but you must also provide more than half their financial support during the tax year. Satisfying the requirements of the support test requires a comprehensive evaluation of your parent’s expenses. The fact that your parent receives sufficient income during the year does not necessarily mean the funds are used for their support. The support test looks to who actually pays rather than the parent’s ability to pay. For example, if your elderly parent only uses their Social Security benefits to pay $300 in monthly rent and you provide all other expenses that total more than $300 each month, then you will satisfy the requirements of the support test even if your parent puts thousands of dollars of tax-exempt income into a savings account each month.

Sharing your parent’s exemption

Oftentimes an elderly parent receives financial support from multiple children during the tax year. In total, the children may satisfy the support test; however, as individuals they may not. The IRS permits these siblings to take turns claiming the parent as a dependent if in the aggregate they can satisfy the support test. However, only a child who contributes at least 10 percent of the parent’s total support during the tax year is able to claim the dependency exemption. If you and your siblings agree to alternate claiming the exemption, the siblings who do not claim the exemption each tax year must sign a document stating that they will refrain from doing so in the current year.

Exemption limitations

If your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) is more than the threshold amount for your filing status, you must reduce your total exemptions by 2 percent for each $2,500 or part of $2,500 that your AGI exceeds the limitation. However, the exemption will never be reduced to zero, regardless of your AGI. For example, in 2010, a single taxpayer with AGI of $166,800 or more must reduce the $3,650 exemption accordingly. Therefore, if your AGI is $169,400, you must reduce the exemption by 4 percent to $3,504 since the excess equals $2,600.

Comments (127) Leave your comment

  1. Hi, I just want to know what is considered taxable income? Social Security, SSI are they taxable income.
    My Mom gets 1187.00 a month In Social Security almost all of it is paid for rent. I pay for all of her other needs .

  2. My mom is 64 years old. She does not have any income. My husband and my income together is $175K. I have a 5 months old baby too. My question is how much I save by claiming my mother in my tax return?

  3. I used the turbotax software and it said my 82 yr. old mother who began living with us in May of 2014 is not considered a dependent. Her adjusted gross income is 3487.00 and we pay all of her living expenses with the exception of medical.

    1. Never mind. I’m a knuclehead. I looked for the word mother on the list of potential dependents instead of just parent. I must really be out of it today!

    2. Hi Patti,
      If you provided over half of her support and her taxable income is under $3,950 you should be able to claim her. I’m wondering if her taxable income is more and she has adjustments making her AGI less than $3,950. If not please go through the interview again and make sure you check off everything correctly:
      – You provide over half of her support
      – She is your relative
      – She does not make over $3,950 if that’s the case
      – No one else can claim her as a dependent
      Thank you,
      Lisa Greene-lewis

  4. Hi, my dad has Alzheimer’s and early dementia. His home was rented out the whole 2014 year and he made $2000/mo. My dad lives in an home for dementia patients and I’m paying for his care at $3,000/mo. Can I use him as a deduction? Thanks.

    1. Hi,
      You could only claim him if his net income from his rental property and other sources is under $3,950. You would need to figure out what his net rental income(rental income, less expenses and depreciation) is and any other income he has. You would also need to provide over half of his support.
      Thank you,
      Lisa Greene-Lewis

  5. my mom and dad both live with me…my mom had a brain hemorage and is now at a nursing home can I claim her on my tax return ….I did not claim her last year…she has been in a nursing home since june of 2012

    1. Hi,
      If you provided over half of her support and she didn’t make over $3,950 you may be able to claim her.
      Thank you,
      Lisa Greene-Lewis

  6. My mom did not live with me but I did pay for her food, clothing and drive her to her Dr appointments weekly/monthly etc. She only had SS and it was about $1285/month. Is she a dependent for my taxes? I have been handling her finances for a few years since she got sick and retired. She had no savings or retirement and I am also sorry to say she passed away last September from leukemia. I am apprehensive to consider her a dependent but my siblings say I can claim her.

    1. Hi,
      So sorry about your mom. If you provided over half of your mom’s support and her taxable income was not more than $3,950 for 2014 then you can claim her.
      Thank you,
      Lisa Greene-Lewis

  7. My mom is 86 and has not had to file a Federal claim for many years. She sold her house in 2014, according to Turbo Tax, she does not have to pay income tax on the sale. Do we still need to file a return for her?

    1. Hi,
      She may not have to pay taxes if she was eligible for the gain exclusion of $250,000 and it yielded zero taxable income, but she does need to still file since she most likely received a 1099-S which is also copied to the IRS.
      Thank you,
      Lisa Greene-Lewis

  8. Hi, someone else asked a very similar question above, but I don’t see an answer for it. My mother in law received $4560 from a foreign pension in 2014. Does that count as taxable income? She has it in a savings account in her home country and cannot access it from here.

  9. My parents have rental income which result in a loss after rental related expenses (interest on loan, property tax, maint. etc.). The only other income they have is Social Security. I provide more than half of the support but they do not live with me. Can I still claim them as dependents?

  10. My brother is 70. He had a minor stroke a few years ago and now lives with my husband and I – both of us are 62. My brother receives just under $12,000/year in Social Security and $70/month from a pension plan. All of my brother’s income goes to pay for home health care during the day so my husband and I can continue working. We have provided free lodging, transportation, meals, clothing, and all other misc personal expenses for almost the last 2 years. Can I claim him as a dependent?

    1. Hello Susan,
      Yes, it sounds like you will be eligible to claim him as a dependent if he meets certain other guidelines.
      When you are going through the Personal Info section regarding dependents, you can enter his information and TurboTax will let you know whether or not he qualifies.

      You can also visit https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1894472 to see all the requirements for claiming someone as a dependent.

      Thanks,
      Nicolle

    2. Greetings, Susan

      Yes. You can claim your brother as a dependent on your income tax return if:

      1. You provided over half of his support for 2014
      2. Your brother was a U.S. citizen, U.S. National, or resident alien for part of 2014.
      3. You brother’s gross income was less than $3,950 for 2014. This is true because half of his social security benefits plus any other gross income was less than $25,000 ($70 x 12 = $840 + $12,000 = $12,840 < $25,000).

      This IRS worksheet for determining support ( http://apps.irs.gov/app/vita/content/globalmedia/teacher/worksheet_for_determining_support_4012.pdf ) takes into account the fair rental value of the home and is a solid tool for you to use prior to using the next IRS tool I am listing for you.

      Please take a moment to use this interactive IRS tool for confirmation: http://www.irs.gov/uac/Who-Can-I-Claim-as-a-Dependent%3F

      Best Regards,

      TurboTax DougR

  11. How do we find out if my mom’s pension is taxable income? It is from the state of MA and she hasn’t had to pay taxes on it in the past.

    1. Hey there, Dorothy-
      The type of pension your mom has is the main factor in deciding whether or not it is taxable income. A great resource to determine whether or not it is nontaxable income is at http://blog.turbotax.intuit.com/2006/05/22/massachusetts-nontaxable-pension/
      However, if you are still uncertain, then please contact the Massachusetts Department of Revenue at 1-800-392-6089. They’ll be able to answer questions specific to your situation.

      Thanks,
      Nicolle Lesuer

  12. Mom mother lives with us in a 2000 sq ft basement apartment. She receives Union Pacific Railroad Retirement Tier One and Tier Two in lieu of social security. Does this count as taxable income or is it only tier two that counts? Also, can we deduct the completion of the handicap chair lift and bathroom renovations for her?

  13. My mother never worked she was house wife my father receives about 6000 of pension in Foreign county – They are both citizens – I provide more than half of support for both of them – can i claim them as descendant ? does 3900 apply to only father ? or it is split between two ?

    1. HI K,
      Glad to hear both of your parent’s are well and in good care. The $3950 personal income test applies to each person separately. So in this case from what you describe, your mother would qualify as your dependent. Since she is a citizen, did not make 3950$ in income, and you provided more than half her care. Your father’s pension amount however would exclude him from being claimed as a dependent on your return.

      The IRS has a fantastic tool that can help you determine quickly who qualifies as a dependent in your household. Just click the first link on the page the comes up in the link I have provided and allow about 10 minutes to complete the questions

      http://search.irs.gov/search?q=who+is+a+dependent&output=xml_no_dtd&proxystylesheet=irs_portals_frontend&client=irs_portals_frontend&oe=UTF-8&ie=UTF-8&num=10&ud=1&exclude_apps=1&site=default_collection&numgm=5&requiredfields=-archive%3A1

  14. My elderly mother is currently living with me, she receives SS and pension, I’m confused on the $3950 gross income is that monthly or for the whole year. I do provide well over half of her monthly support. Would I be able to claim her on my taxes as a dependent?

    1. Hello Janet,
      The $3,950 gross income is a yearly amount of which a dependents income must be under. To be able to claim your mother as a dependent on your taxes you would need to meet the following criteria:

      1. Mothers gross income must be $3,950 or less for the year (Generally you will not count SS
      towards this.)
      2. You must be providing more than half of your mothers monthly support.

      Also, to better understand the steps to Claiming an Elderly parent please review the link below: https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tools/tax-tips/Family/Steps-to-Claiming-an-Elderly-Parent-as-a-Dependent/INF19455.html

      Thank you,

      TurboTax Sherri

  15. Hello, I pay my father $6,000 a year for watching my two children but he doesn’t work, only receives pension. He is completely dependent on me. Can I claim him as a dependent on my state taxes?

    1. Hi Susan,
      No, I don’t believe you can claim him as a dependent. One of the requirements to claim someone as a dependent is that they had less than $3,950 of income for the entire year (Generally, that amount does not include Social Security benefits).
      However, you can still go through the interview about dependents, and TurboTax will determine whether or not he qualifies based on more information.

      If you’d like to see more about who qualifies as a dependent, then please visit https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1894472

      Thank You,
      Nicolle

  16. I retired early due to illness and only receive $866 in social security benefits. I live in an apartrnenbseat paying $800 for rent that includes all utilities. My son buys my food,clothing and shoes,pays for transportation to my doctor appointments and medicine. Can he claim me as a dependent on his federal taxes?

    1. Hello Beverly,

      Yes, he would be able to claim you as a dependent since he is providing more than half of your total support expenses for the year. However, there are also three other test which he would have to be able to pass as well. If he can answer yes to no one else can claim you, your gross income being less than $3,950 (which it would be because you don’t claim Social Security as income), and you live with him or qualify as a relataive on IRS publication 501(http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p501.pdf) then you are able to be claimed as his dependent.

      Thank you,

      TurboTax Sherri

    2. I am retired and receive $1027.00 in social security benefits and Medicade pays ONLY my part B. I live in my son’s home and pay $125.00 to help pay for utilities. He pays for the rest of the utilities ($250.00) and other expenses of owning a home. By living here I have a nice place to live in a safe part of town and I am not alone and he looks after me, taking me to doctor appointments, paying for things I do not have the money to cover( car maintenance, medical that is not covered by medicare) Can he claim me as a dependent on his federal taxes?

    1. Hello Lrao,

      Unfortunately even if you are able to claim your parent as a dependent the Capital loss can only be claimed by your parent. Since the capital loss is associated to their Social Security / Tax ID number then they are the only ones able to claim and report that capital loss.

      Thank you,

      Sherri Chambers

  17. Hello, I am 71 years old and live with my son. He doesn’t charge me for rent and he pays most of other bills (sometimes I pay for groceries). I pay my medical bills. I only get $ 1.385.00 SS and pension of $187.00. I have some savings in Mutual Funds, CD. My main income is SS and pension.
    What proof my son and I need to qualify as a dependent?.
    I didn’t file taxes this year or last year either previous year.
    Is it if you earned $11,400.00 than you have to file income taxes? Is that correct?
    Thank you. Krystyna

    1. Hello Krystyna,
      If you are unmarried and at least 65 years of age, then you must file an income tax return if your gross income is $11,700 or more. However, if you live on Social Security benefits, you don’t include this in gross income. If this is the only income you receive, then your gross income equals zero, and you don’t have to file a federal income tax return. But if you do earn other income that is not tax-exempt, then each year you must determine whether the total exceeds $11,700. If you are married and file a joint return with a spouse who is also 65 or older, you must file a return if your combined gross income is $22,900 or more. If your spouse is under 65 years old, then the threshold amount decreases to $21,700. Keep in mind that these income thresholds only apply to the 2014 tax year, and generally increase slightly each year. The following link has great information on when Senior Citizens can stop filing taxes: https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tools/tax-tips/Taxes-101/When-Does-a-Senior-Citizen-on-Social-Security-Stop-Filing-Taxes-/INF14328.html

      As far as trying to be claimed a dependent there are 4 test that you and your son would have to pass before he is able to claim you. One of these test is that your gross income can not exceed $3,950. He also would have to provide more than half of your total support for the year, no one else is able to claim you as a dependent, and you must live with him or be on list of relatives that do not have to live with you to be claimed a dependent (IRS Publication 501 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p501.pdf).

      Thank you,

      TurboTax Sherri

  18. I am working here on a h1 visa and my parents visited me in USA last year on a visitor visa..stayed here for 180 days..I bear all the expenses.. can I claim them as dependent ?

    1. Hello Gaurav,

      Since they were visiting I am assuming they are not United State citizens so no you wouldn’t be able to claim them as dependents. The IRS has a tool that can help you determine if someone is able to be claimed as a dependent. The tool is located at http://www.irs.gov/uac/Who-Can-I-Claim-as-a-Dependent%3F . A dependent has to be a US citizen, permanent resident, residnet alien or resident of Mexico or Canada to be able to be claimed as dependent on your taxes. Also, you would have to pass the 4 test the IRS has created which are: Gross income is $3,950 or less, no one else can claim them as dependents, you provided more than half of their support for the year, and they must be living with you for the year unless meet requirement for qualified relative on IRS Publication 501(http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p501.pdf).

      Thank you,

      TurboTax Sherri

  19. My husband tends to most of his mother’s financial needs (paying bills, bookkeeping, banking, etc.) as well as her medical needs (transportation to medical appointments, prescriptions, visitations) on a regular basis. Is there a provision in the tax system that allows him to deduct this from our taxes?

    1. Hello Susan,
      You may be able to claim some tax breaks for helping your mother-in-law throughout the year. TurboTax will of course ask you during the interview process if you have any dependents and if your mother-in-law is meeting the requirements to be claimed as a dependent this will provide you a tax break.

      To claim her as a dependent you will have to pass the following 4 test:
      1. She is not a Qualifying Child
      2. Member of household or Relationship test (This would pass since she is a parent)
      3. Gross Income Test (Your parent’s gross income for the year must be less than $3,900. This amount excludes income from
      Social Security, disability payments or tax-exempt income.)
      4. Support Test (In order to meet the requirements of this test, you must pay for over half of your parent’s expenses. There are
      many factors involved in coming to this conclusion including food, housing, clothing, medical care, and
      transportation expenses.)

      You may also be able to claim the Dependent Care Credit if you paid someone else to care for your elderly parent so you were allowed the opportunity to work or look for work. If eligible, you would be allowed a credit of up to 35 percent of the expenses paid for dependent care with the maximum amount of expenses being $3,000. This means the tax credit can be worth up to $1,050. To be eligible, you (and your spouse if filing jointly) must have earned income during the year, and the care recipient must be unable to physically or mentally care for him or herself. Care recipients must also be claimed as a dependent (if the recipient’s income is under $3,900) on the caregiver’s tax return, and you must identify all persons or organizations that provide care, according to the qualifications listed on IRS Form 2441.

      If you are unable to claim your mother-in-law as a dependent, because she has an income that exceeds the #3,900, the IRS allows caregivers to deduct costs incurred from a parent’s health care, such as hospitalization, prescription drugs, dental care and even long-term care services.

      A complete list of deductible medical expenses is available in IRS Publication 502: Medical and Dental Expenses. The deduction is limited to medical expenses that are in excess of 10% percent of the caregiver’s adjusted gross income (AGI) (7.5% if either your or your spouse was born before January 2, 1949).

      The following link has information of what medical expenses that may be claimed for a deduction as well per the IRS publication 502:
      http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p502.pdf

      Thank you for using TurboTax,

      TurboTax Sherri

  20. my mom lives with me. she pays be $300 a month. she only get SS. if I claim her will she lose her food stamps, meidcade or Medicare benefits?

    1. Claiming her on your taxes doesn’t affect her benefits like food stamps or medicaid the amount of benefits is based off of the net monthly income of the household and provided on a state level. If you are unsure of any affects that may happen I would suggest reaching out to the Health and Human Services Department that is local to your area and asking them if they have any unknown criteria to your mother being claimed on someone else’s taxes affecting her Food Stamps, Medicaid, or any other state offered benefits.

      As far as your mother’s SS it may be affected by her being claimed as a dependent, because the agency will count the market value of that housing as income and offset her benefit accordingly. If you are claiming her as a dependent and thus providing at least half of her support, she may exceed the income guidelines for SSI. If she is on SSDI, then being claimed as a dependent has no affect on the benefits she is receiving from SSDI. If she is receiving SS Retirement Benefits, then as long as her income does not exceed $3,900 your claiming her as a dependent would not affect her SS benefits in this case either.

  21. If an elderly parent whose income is only through ssi benifits and has no other income and he stays with his daughter.can daughter claim him as adependent for income tax purposes?

    1. parent ges around $650 each month as SSi payments.And he has no other income and stays with his daughter who provides shelter and utilities and other basic needs.Parent contributes only for his food .Can daughter claim his as dependendant?

      1. Hello Jaivanth,
        As long as the gross income is $3,950 or under for your parent, no one else can claim parent as dependent, you are providing more than 50% of support for the year for your parent, and your parent is living with you then yes you would be able to claim your parent as a dependent.

        Thank you,

        TurboTax Sherri

  22. My mother who is 84 and received only Social Security has lived with me for over 3 years. Aftershe pays her expenses I have to pay for the test of her care which is quiet expensive. She only has her social security as an income. Would I qualify to count her as an exemption? I am single and head of household.if so what documentation is needed?

    1. Hello Regina,

      You may be able to claim your mother as a dependent relative for the $3,950 tax exemption. Though she does not need to live with you, she would need to meet the following requirements to be claimed as such.

      – Have been a citizen or resident of the United States, or a resident of Canada or Mexico.
      – Did not file a joint income tax return with anyone else.
      – Received more than half his or her support from you.
      – Had less than $3,950 of income for the entire year. (Generally that amount does not include Social Security benefits.)

      For more information regarding dependent relative please review the following linked article: https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1894472-who-is-a-dependent

      Also, for more information on the difference between an exemption and dependent review the link below:
      https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1899192-what-is-the-difference-between-a-dependent-and-an-exemption

      Thank you,

      TurboTax Sherri

  23. I moved to NV in 2013 to take care of my dad who is 73 and many medical issue . He does get social security income and $100 in food stamp. He lives with me and I pay for everything including when he runs out of food. Can I claim him on my taxes.?

    1. Hi Starlyn,
      You can claim him if you provide over half of his support and he doesn’t earn over $3,950 in taxable income.
      Thank you,
      Lisa Greene-Lewis

    2. Hello. My mother is 85. We share a home that is her mortgage but we’re both on the title. I pay all bills. I qualify to claim head of household, so may I claim the mortgage interest and her medical bills as well? Is there a separate form needed when I claim her on my taxes or do I just list her along with me three sons (dependents).

      1. Hi Tracye,
        You would just answer the questions in TurboTax about her being a dependent and TurboTax will give you the exemption for her if you are eligible. Regarding home mortgage interest there will be an option for you to answer that you did not receive a 1098 for mortgage interest in your name but you did pay it. You can also claim her medical expenses if you are able to claim your mother as a dependent.
        Thank you,
        Lisa Greene-Lewis

  24. I am a bur confused about claiming parents. They on get social security and i take care of their needs. Whatever they need and there is no money left of their checks i pay.i take them to appointsand do everything i have asked before but was told they have to live with you. So should i be able to claim them..

    1. Hi Irene,
      Only non-relatives have to live with you. You can claim them if you provide over half of their support, they do not make over $3,950 taxable income, and they meet the citizenship tests.
      Thank you,
      Lisa Greene-Lewis

  25. Hello,
    My elderly parent was evicted from her apartment (she received public assistance for her rent) in one state and subsequently moved in to my home in another state. She lost any assistance for rent when she was evicted. She has lived with me since September of 2014. She pays no rent. Her only income is social security.
    Is this an instance where I can claim her as a dependent? Do I need to subsequently file as a “head of household”.
    Not living with anyone, I never claimed myself as a head of household.
    Any information you can provide would be helpful.
    Thanks,
    MB

    1. Hi Brenda,
      It sounds like she more than likely can. However, there are more factors that go into determining who qualifies as a dependent. A great resource for information to help you is at https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1894472
      Plus, when you are going through the Personal Info tab of your return, TurboTax will ask questions regarding anyone you want to try to claim as a dependent to make it easier on you. When you are done with the dependent section, it will tell you whether or not she qualifies.

      Thanks,
      Nicolle Lesuer

    2. Greetings, Brenda

      Yes. You can claim your Mother as a dependent on your income tax return if:

      1. You provided over half of her support for year (your Mother did not have to live with you during 2014).
      2. Your Mother was a U.S. citizen, U.S. National, or resident alien for part of 2014.
      3.You Mother’s gross income was less than $3,950 for 2014. This is true because half of her social security benefits plus any other gross income was less than $25,000 ($778 x 12 = $9,936 < $25,000).

      Please take a moment to use this interactive IRS tool for confirmation: http://www.irs.gov/uac/Who-Can-I-Claim-as-a-Dependent%3F

      Best regards,

      TurboTaxDougR

    3. Greetings, Brenda

      Yes. You can claim your Mother as a dependent on your income tax return if:

      1. You provided over half of her support for year (your Mother did not have to live with you during 2014).
      2. Your Mother was a U.S. citizen, U.S. National, or resident alien for part of 2014.
      3. You Mother’s gross income was less than $3,950 for 2014. This is true because half of her social security benefits plus any other gross income was less than $25,000 ($778 x 12 = $9,936 < $25,000).

      Please take a moment to use this interactive IRS tool for confirmation: http://www.irs.gov/uac/Who-Can-I-Claim-as-a-Dependent%3F

      Best regards,

      TurboTaxDougR

  26. My father hasn’t worked,i been supporting him for food and other expenses and rent he is 65 years old.he recently received ss about $500 and ssi about $24th month. Can I claim him as a dependent

  27. There is major conflicting information here about the support test: I hope the latter is true – it seems to match the IRS regs.

    http://blog.turbotax.intuit.com/2011/07/20/can-you-claim-your-elderly-parents-on-your-taxes/

    Satisfying the support test:”if your elderly parent only uses their Social Security benefits to pay $300 in monthly rent and you provide all other expenses that total more than $300 each month, then you will satisfy the requirements of the support test even if your parent puts thousands of dollars of tax-exempt income into a savings account each month.”

    https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tools/tax-tips/Family/Steps-to-Claiming-an-Elderly-Parent-as-a-Dependent/INF19455.html
    Support Requirement: last sentence:
    “Compare the value of support you provide with any income, including Social Security, that your parent receives to determine whether you meet the support requirement. The amount of support you provided must exceed your parent’s income by at least one dollar.”

  28. Hello,
    My mother receives military pension from divorce and sums up to over $3,950, but does military pension considers as taxable or nontaxable income. If nontaxable that mean i can claim her as dependent right?

    1. Hi Arnett,
      The military pension is considered taxable income so you would not be able to claim her if she provided over half of her own support.
      Thank you,
      Lisa Greene-Lewis

  29. Hello,

    My father has not worked in the last 2 years and since then I have been supporting him with rent, food and some other expenses, he is 62 years old. He recently received his earning records and its shows no income in 2011, 2012, 2013 (says not yet recorded)

    Can I claim him as a dependent?

    Regards

    1. Hi Hugo,
      Yes, if he meets the following test:
      – He is a US citizen, US National, resident of Mexico or Canada
      – He did not earn over $3,950 in taxable income
      – You provided over half of his support.
      Thank you,
      Lisa Greene-Lewis

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